30 Jun 17

No Sightings in so far today..................

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On this day..........
2016
Priorslee Lake
Today's Sightings Here

2015
Priorslee Lake
Today's sighting Here

2014
Priorslee Lake
Today's Sightings Here

2010
Priorslee Lake
Common Sandpiper
(Ed Wilson)

2006
Priorslee Lake
1 drake Ruddy Duck
(Ed Wilson)

29 Jun 17

Priorslee Lake: 21:00

Common Scoter - 1 (female; previously reported by J. Almond)

(John Isherwood)

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On this day..........
2015
Priorslee Lake
Today's sighting Here

2013
Priorslee Lake
15 Cormorants
(Ed Wilson)

2011
Priorslee Lake
Common Sandpiper
(Ed Wilson)

2010
Priorslee Lake
Juvenile Yellow Wagtail
(Ed Wilson)

2009
Priorslee Lake
Siskin
(Ed Wilson)

2006
Priorslee Lake
2 drake Ruddy Ducks
(Ed Wilson)

28 Jun 17

No Sightings in today.

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On this day..........
2016
Priorslee Lake
Today's sightings Here

2009
Priorslee Lake
Yellow Wagtail
(Ed Wilson)

2006
Priorslee Lake
Common Tern
(Ed Wilson)

27 Jun 17

No Sightings in today.

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On this day..........
2012
Priorslee Lake
Common Sandpiper
(Ed Wilson)

2009
Priorslee Lake
2 Redshank
(Ed Wilson)

2006
Priorslee Lake
2 Ruddy Duck
(Ed Wilson)

26 Jun 17

No Sightings in today.

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On this day..........
2013
Priorslee Lake
Grasshopper Warbler
(Ed Wilson)

2012
Priorslee Lake
Special this morning was rather bizarre: an all-white, apparently albino, Budgerigar(!) sheltering in the copse between the football field and the playground!
(Ed Wilson)

2008
Priorslee Lake
Common Sandpiper
Another slight puzzle this morning. It sounded like a 'Blackcap with a difference' with an extended song with lots more variety than usual and many notes recalling Garden Warbler, Song Thrush and Blackbird. It was clearly NOT the bird from earlier but I was curious. It was always singing well above head-height (Acros tend to be below head-height) and never had the rhythm of an Acro but the long and flowing song was very strange (and very loud). In the end the bird gave itself up and proved to be what I thought - a 'Blackcap with a difference' - lots of testosterone? It proved my 'rule of thumb' - if you are not sure whether it is a Blackcap or a Garden Warbler it is a Blackcap.
(Ed Wilson)

25 Jun 17

No Sightings in today.

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On this day..........
2013
Priorslee Lake
Willow Tits
(Ed Wilson)

2012
Priorslee Lake
Probable Grasshopper Warbler
(Ed Wilson)

Priorslee Flash
Peregrine Falcon
(Ed Wilson)

2007
Priorslee Lake
The water level was the highest I have seen it for many years and the rows of marker buoys just off the southbank had all disappeared under the water. The full effect of Wesley Brook downstream has been devastating for Shifnal, with so much water in the reservoir it was no surprise to hear that many premises alongside the brook were under 2 to 3 feet of water for the second time this month.
(Martin Adlam)

2006
Priorslee Lake
Ruddy Duck
(Ed Wilson)

24 Jun 17

No Sightings in today.

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On this day..........
2016
Priorslee Flash
Today's News Here

2011
Priorslee Lake
Common Sandpiper - First returning
(Ed Wilson)

2008
Priorslee Lake
Common Sandpiper - First returning
(Ed Wilson)

2006
Priorslee Lake
1 drake Ruddy Duck
1 Snipe
1 Common Sandpiper - First returning
At least 38 Swifts
(Ed Wilson)

23 Jun 17

No Sightings in today.

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On this day..........
2016
Priorslee Flash
Today's News Here

2012
Priorslee Lake
Plover sp.
(Ed Wilson)

2008
Priorslee Lake - Map
Unlikely as it seems I am pretty convinced about this on the basis of the song alone
I was walking along the W end path at c.06:15 when a strange song caught my attention: there had been young Reed Warblers flitting about the area away from the reeds and it sound 'Acro-like'. But it was far too fast and I then assumed it was a Sedge Warbler (especially after my bird in the town centre last week). But the sound was all wrong with what seemed more like Garden Warbler tones, though with the characteristic Acro dynamics.
The bird was singing from a small patch of bushes growing in the fence at the W end of the yacht compound and I had the choice of a close view directly in to the bright sun; or going the 'other side' and trying to see between the yachts at some distance. I decided to stay where I was and in response to gentle pishing I got a good-enough glimpse to confirm it was a  Reed / Marsh and not Sedge Warbler and certainly an Acro.
The song continued to puzzle and included all manner of oddities, sounding at times like juvenile Great Tit begging, all while singing at full volume.
I decided that the best thing would be to try and record the bird so I dashed back to the car for my digital tape recorder. When I returned the bird was not singing and pishing produced only a Wren and a pair of Bullfinches!
Revisited the area twice more for some 15 minutes on each occasion without success: was not too surprised as it was a small and rather unlikely spot for the bird to stay in.
Worth rechecking - but I went all around the lake twice without hearing anything untoward.
Only my second-ever UK Marsh Warbler - the last was as long ago as when they bred in Worcestershire! But familiar with the birds abroad as recently as May in Poland where I heard maybe 20.
I really cannot see what else it might have been: I am not that confident to say it WAS a Marsh Warbler song, only that I have no idea what else it could have been and it fits the general pattern of song.(Ed Wilson)

2007
Priorslee Village
A pair of Siskins
(Martin Adlam)

2006
Priorslee Lake
Common Tern
(Ed Wilson)


Note
We shall see what today brings. Good old Sky Broadband was down for most of yesterday and definitely off from 8:30pm last to 9:50am this morning. So if there aren't any daily Blogs showing on here we all know why.

22 Jun 17

No Sightings in today.

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On this day..........
2012
Priorslee Lake
Common Tern
(Ed Wilson)

2009
Priorslee Lake
Pochard
Nuthatch
Swarm of bees
(Ed Wilson)

2006
Priorslee Lake
Drake Ruddy Duck
(Ed Wilson)

21 Jun 17

No Sightings in today.

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On this day..........
2013
Priorslee Lake
Possible Black-necked Grebe seen by locals yesterday evening.
(Ed Wilson)

20 Jun 17

Priorslee Lake and The Flash

16.0°C > 18.5°C: Fine and rather hazy again with thin high cloud. Moderate WNW wind fell away somewhat. Very good visibility

Sunrise: 04:44 BST yet again

Priorslee Lake: 04:19 – 05:40 // 06:45 – 08:20

(80th visit of the year)

Notes from today:
- the Mallard ducklings conundrum: I now believe there was only ever one group of juveniles with the single duck. Until last Sunday there were 4 juveniles; since then only three. The juveniles were large-enough to appear to be safe from most predators, but ....
- a drake Tufted Duck flew in
- the only Grey Heron today was one flying in the distance
- yet another new Coot brood but two other recent broods not located today
- the first 4 Swifts arrived at 04:35 and soon after at least 10 were racing about. Gone by 05:15 and none seen later
- Kingfisher was a new bird for my 2017 Flash list yesterday: today my first since 20 April seen here
- a couple of House Sparrows made it from the estate in to the hedge alongside the academy and hence in to my recording area
- a rather unseasonal Linnet briefly in bushes around the running / cricket field
and
- just 1 moth on the new street lamps – a male White Ermine
- Timothy Tortrix and Common Nettle-tap (Anthophila fabriciana) moths in the vegetation again
- my first-ever Blastobasis adustella (aka Dingy Dowd) moth seen being attacked by a crab spider sp., likely Misumena vatia
- Large Skipper and Ringlet butterflies
- the usual trio of Common Blue, Azure and Blue-tailed Damselflies
- the lacewing Chrysopa perla seen in the vegetation today
- both Episyrphus balteatus and Melanostoma scalare hoverflies identified
- the beetle Rhagonycha fulva, also ‘bloodsucker’ or Hogweed Bonking-beetle

On with the bird totals

Birds noted flying over the lake
- 1 Greylag Goose
- 2 Canada Geese
- 1 Grey Heron
- 2 Lesser Black-backed Gull (singles)
- 17 Feral Pigeons (1 party)
- 4 Wood Pigeons
- 5 Jackdaws

Hirundine etc. counts:
- >10 Swifts
- 2 House Martins again

Warblers counts: number in brackets = singing birds
- 6 (5) Chiffchaffs
- 1 (1) Willow Warbler
- 10 (9) Blackcaps
- 4 (3) Garden Warblers
- 2 (1) Common Whitethroats again
- 2 (0) Sedge Warblers
- 5 (4) Reed Warblers

The counts from the lake area
- 2 + 3 Mute Swans
- 17 (14♂) + 3 (1 brood) Mallard
- 1 (1♂) Tufted Duck
- 6 + 2 (1 brood) Great Crested Grebes
- 4 + 3 (1 brood) Moorhens
- 26 + 6 (5 broods) Coots

A slight salmon-pink start to the sunrise.

Slightly more impressive later.

Too much high cloud to colour properly.

Great Crested Grebe of course.

Another view of Great Crested Grebe with the sunrise effect on the water.

The Sedge Warblers were uncharacteristically uncooperative when they first set up territory but now seem to accept my presence so I make no apology for this set. Here we can even see the nostril.

From this angle we see the darker crown above the broad supercilium.

The supercilium extends well behind the eye.

The rather rounded tail is seen here.

 ... but can be spread!

A moth with long legs? Nope: this moth was being attacked by a crab spider sp., likely Misumena vatia again. As for the moth it is my first-ever Blastobasis adustella (aka Dingy Dowd). A native Australian moth that was introduced in to Europe and is spreading everywhere. The larva feed on Teasel heads.

A clear shot of a Ringlet butterfly today.

A nice pose from this Episyrphus balteatus (Marmalade hoverfly), a specimen with reduced markings.

This is the beetle Rhagonycha fulva. Though harmless because of its colour it used to be called ‘bloodsucker’ but in these more enlightened(?) times it is known as the Hogweed Bonking-beetle because pairs can be seen mating on Common Hogweed.

Better than the flash shot on the street-lamp yesterday: here is the lacewing Chrysopa perla.

A spider sp. obviously. I looked on the web and nothing immediately allows me to ID it. Appears to make a flat sheet web on the leaves – most odd.

(Ed Wilson)

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The Flash: 05:50 – 06:35

(61st visit of the year)

Notes from here
- the number of geese increased again: neither of the hybrid geese noted. The birds are probably gathering to moult – like all geese and ducks they moult their flight feathers at more or less the same time and so are more or less flightless. They find the island a safe haven at this time
- exactly how many juvenile Moorhens and Coots there are is hard to say as adults were still brooding some birds. At least one new brood of Coots today; conversely another brood seems to have disappeared
- the Kingfisher again
and
- Self-heal (Prunella vulgaris) flowering at the N end – a plant I have yet to find at the lake

Birds noted flying over
None

Hirundine etc. counts
- 8 Swifts again
- 4 House Martins

Warblers counts: number in brackets = singing birds
- 3 (2) Chiffchaffs
- 2 (2) Blackcaps

The counts from the water
- 2 + 7 Mute Swans
- 36 Greylag Geese
- 213 Canada Geese
- 1 white feral goose
- 10 (9♂) Mallard
- 4 (2♂) Tufted Ducks
- 1 Great Crested Grebe still
- 2 + >3 (2 broods) Moorhens
- 16 + >5 (>3 broods) Coots

The flowers of Self-heal (Prunella vulgaris).

Of interest between the lake and The Flash today
- the usual Chiffchaff singing around the lower pool
- two Blackcaps started singing near the lower pool – both at locations not used for weeks
and
- Harlequin Ladybird larva

(Ed Wilson)

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On this day..........
2009
Priorslee Lake
A pair of Siskins
(Ed Wilson)

2008
Priorslee Lake
A drake Ruddy Duck
(Ed Wilson)

19 Jun 17

Priorslee Lake and The Flash

15.5°C > 19.5°C: Fine and rather hazy with some cloud later. Light W wind. Good visibility

Sunrise: 04:44 BST again

Priorslee Lake: 04:22 – 05:30 // 06:25 – 07:50

(79th visit of the year)

Notes from today:
- yesterday’s unidentified group of Mallard seems to be a duck with three fledged juveniles. I did not see the other duck with her four unfledged juveniles today. I am rather confused as I took photos of what seems to be different parties of just three juveniles. I could never see ‘both’ groups so remain unconvinced
- a pair of Tufted Duck present early only; later a drake flew in
- another new Coot brood but losses seem very high this year
- three tern sp. arrived at 07:30 and flew around twice and left. From the very ‘elastic’ wing beats and apparently long tail-streamers I did wonder about Arctic Tern but the rather poor photos I was able take do not support this and suggests they were Common Terns again
- small but variable number of Swifts almost throughout: how many different birds?
- the Willow Warbler sang but once and then only briefly today
- almost all the singing Reed Warblers were away from the two main reed beds. Are these late arrivals still trying to establish a territory? failed breeders looking for alternative sites? breeding birds on feeding forays? Answers on a postcard to ...
and
- 2 moths on the new street lamps – a Common Emerald and a May Highflier
- a Lacewing sp., probably Chrysopa perla, also on the street lamps
- many Timothy Tortrix moths again – only seem to flush these early on
- at least 1 Common Marble (Celypha lacunana) flushed later
- Large Skipper butterflies again
- the usual trio of Common Blue, Azure and Blue-tailed Damselflies
- more Black Snipe flies (Chrysopilus cristatus)

On with the bird totals

Birds noted flying over the lake
- 1 Lesser Black-backed Gull again
- 22 Feral Pigeons (1 party)
- 14 Wood Pigeons
- 2 Jackdaws

Hirundine etc. counts:
- >6 Swifts
- 2 Barn Swallows
- 2 House Martins

Warblers counts: number in brackets = singing birds
- 7 (7) Chiffchaffs
- 1 (1) Willow Warbler briefly
- 13 (10) Blackcaps
- 2 (2) Garden Warblers
- 2 (1) Common Whitethroats
- 2 (1) Sedge Warblers
- 7 (5) Reed Warblers

The counts from the lake area
- 2 + 3 Mute Swans
- 20 (16♂) + 3 (1 brood) Mallard (see notes)
- 3 (2♂) Tufted Ducks
- 1 Grey Heron again
- 7 + 2 (1 brood) Great Crested Grebes
- 5 Moorhens
- 23 + 7 (5 broods) Coots
- 3 Common Terns again

The sunrise.

And a nice skyscape later.

The Mute Swan family seems to have adopted the heap of cut under-water weed as a soft resting place.

The three ducklings that were with a duck Mallard. The two on the left with all-dark bills are likely drakes; the one on the right a duck with the brown edge to the bill.

The conundrum: here there seems to be a single drake nearest me; the other two look like ducks in the making. Mum at the back. Same group or not?

A moulted feather from the speculum a Mallard.

The lone drake Tufted Duck that flew in long after the pair present at dawn had left.

The best of a bad bunch of tern photos. While the colour of the bill looks more blood-red (Arctic) than orangey (Common) it shows a dark tip and the dark outer trailing edge of the underwing is certainly diffuse – both pointing to Common Tern.

Almost unrecognisable: not sure whether this Great Tit is just moulting at the end of a hard breeding season or whether it has ‘mange’ or the birdy equivalent thereof.

This juvenile Great Tit still seems very young as there is a hint of the yellow gape remaining. Most parties of Great Tits seemed to fledge at least two week ago (the early light through the trees has accentuated the yellow tones on the body somewhat).

A Sedge Warbler with a beakful for its offspring.

Do not often get a chance to see this species in the open, even if it was a bit far away – a Treecreeper using its tail as a prop as it winds its way up – always up – this trunk.

Here we see the thin bill used for prising goodies out of cracks in the trunk.

Not at a very helpful angle. However this Common Emerald moth is easily identified as the only ‘green’ moth with the checkered wing-edges.

This moth, high up on a light seems to be a very worn May Highflier – this species persists in to July.

This neatly-marked Flame Carpet was on the roof of the Priorslee Avenue foot-tunnel.

The strength of the marking at the rear of the wing separate Small and Large Skipper – their size difference is minimal and of no practical use. In the field this looked ‘clean-enough’ for a Small Skipper but I am pretty sure it is not – the shading on the hind part ahead of the black sub-terminal band would not show on either a fresh or worn Small Skipper.
This lacewing is probably Chrysopa perla.

(Ed Wilson)

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The Flash: 05:35 – 06:15

(60th visit of the year)

A Kingfisher was, surprisingly, my first here this year and so became my #66 on my 2017 Flash list

Other notes from here
- the Greylag x Canada Goose this morning was the ‘old’ easy to separate bird and I could not locate yesterday’s bird
- 2 new broods of 4 and 3 Moorhens; one full-sized juvenile from an earlier brood
- also a new brood of just 2 Coots, though they were being brooded and there may have been more ‘underneath’!
- the 2 Lesser Black-backed Gulls had a close look at the water: not sure whether they actually touched down
- one of the Blackcaps was a juvenile gleaning from the vegetation at the ‘top’ of the water

Birds noted flying over
None

Hirundine etc. counts
- 3 Swifts again
- 2 House Martins again

Warblers counts: number in brackets = singing birds
- 3 (3) Chiffchaffs
- 3 (1) Blackcaps

The counts from the water
- 2 + 7 Mute Swans
- 33 Greylag Geese
- 1 Greylag x Canada Goose
- 168 Canada Geese
- 1 white feral goose
- 15 (13♂) Mallard
- 6 (4♂) Tufted Ducks
- 1 Great Crested Grebe again
- 4 + 8 (3 broods) Moorhens
- 17 + 8 (4 broods) Coots
- 2 Lesser Black-backed Gulls, briefly

Of interest between the lake and The Flash today
- a Moorhen heard calling from the lower pool
- the usual Chiffchaff singing around the lower pool
and
- a Flame Carpet moth on the roof of the tunnel under Priorslee Avenue
- molehills alongside the Wesley Brook – cannot recall them here before

(Ed Wilson)

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On this day..........

2008
Telford Town Centre
A singing Sedge Warbler by the entrance to the Blue Willow car park.
(Ed Wilson)

18 Jun 17

Priorslee Lake and The Flash

13.5°C > 21.0°C: Fine and clear. Calm. Good visibility

Sunrise: 04:44 BST

Priorslee Lake: 04:13 – 05:40 // 06:35 – 08:51

(78th visit of the year)

Best today were the three Common Terns fishing at 07:15 – my 94th species at this site in 2017. Two of them stayed a matter of minutes, the third landed on one of the buoys and stayed until at least 08:15

Notes from today:
- two groups of 6 Canada Geese over: likely the same party going out to feed and then coming back
- never saw this group of Mallard well-enough to be certain, and never at the same time as the usual group of the duck Mallard with her four well-grown juveniles, but there could have been another four present: either a duck with three fledged juveniles or four fledged juveniles together
- the pair of Tufted Duck present early only
- only 3 adult Great Crested Grebes noted: the pair with two now well-grown juveniles; and a lone bird
- one of the Coot broods was new with one brood from last Wednesday apparently no more
and
- 5 moths on the new street lamps – a male White Ermine, 2 Brimstone Moths, a Silver-ground Carpet and a Common Pug
- several Timothy Tortrix moths again – easily my best year for this species
- another Silver-ground Carpet flushed from the vegetation
- my first Straw Dot moth of the year flushed from vegetation
- also my first Yellow-barred Longhorn (Nemophora degeerella) moth of the year
- more Common Nettle-tap (Anthophila fabriciana) moths
- many Large Skipper butterflies and my first Ringlets here this year
- the usual trio of Common Blue, Azure and Blue-tailed Damselflies
- a 7-spot Ladybird; and a Harlequin Ladybird larva
- at least five species of hoverfly with Episyrphus balteatus, Helophilus pendulus and Melanostoma scalare, all confirmed. A probable Anasimyia lineata is new for me. In addition very many ‘drone flies’ hovering at eye-height but separation of the two Eristalis species – tenax and pertinax requires seeing the colour of the hind tibia. Not easy in flight!
- a small group of Semaphore flies (Poecilobothrus nobilitatus)
- the beetle Oedemera nobilis seen
- a crab spider sp. likely Misumena vatia hiding away
- the first Meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria) just beginning to flower

On with the bird totals

Birds noted flying over the lake
- 1 Greylag Goose
- 12 Canada Geese (2 groups)
- 1 Lesser Black-backed Gull
- 1 Feral Pigeon
- 3 Wood Pigeons
- 4 Jackdaws
- 2 Rooks
- 5 Starlings

Hirundine etc. counts:
- 4 Swifts
- 4 Barn Swallows
- 3 House Martins

Warblers counts: number in brackets = singing birds
- 6 (6) Chiffchaffs
- 1 (1) Willow Warbler again
- 12 (10) Blackcaps
- 3 (3) Garden Warblers again
- 5 (2) Common Whitethroats
- 2 (0) Sedge Warblers
- 6 (3) Reed Warblers

The counts from the lake area
- 2 + 3 Mute Swans
- 15 (12♂) + 4 (1 brood) Mallard (see notes)
- 2 (1♂) Tufted Ducks
- 1 Grey Heron again
- 3 + 2 (1 brood) Great Crested Grebes
- 5 + 1 (1 brood) Moorhens
- 20 + 6 (4 broods) Coots
- 3 Common Terns
 Nothing too special about the sunrise this morning – only that this was at 04:20.

My first sighting of the Common Terns was this individual fishing. The black tip to the bill and the dark ‘wedge’ on the primaries separates from similar tern species – easy to see in the photo: not so easy with the eyes.

This bill is closer here but we cannot see the wing pattern.

We can here ....

... and here as it manoeuvres for another dive.

At rest on a buoy. An Arctic Tern – the most likely alternative – would show an all blood-red bill and very short legs.

Different lighting from a different angle.

A Common Whitethroat peering out at me: did not like what it saw and disappeared.

‘Only’ a Pied Wagtail. I had to double-check this with the book. There were sounds of Pied Wagtail but there were three birds and this one looked rather long-tailed, more like a Grey Wagtail. What does a juvenile Grey Wagtail look like? Juveniles are supposed to generally have shorter tails though. So look it up. Juvenile Grey Wagtails never show pale edges to the coverts so it is ‘only’ a Pied, likely an adult moulting after breeding.

Showing all the markings of a Brimstone Moth.

Not many features visible on this pug moth to help ID: I think it is the plainest and commonest – a Common Pug.

This male White Ermine moth is sitting such that we can clearly see the feathered antenna.

Lurking in the undergrowth is this Straw Dot moth.

Also in the vegetation was this Yellow-barred Longhorn (Nemophora degeerella) moth.

The markings on the Common Nettle-tap (Anthophila fabriciana) moth are rather variable: this one is perhaps one of the best I have seen, certainly this year.

A Large Skipper – a male with the scent mark in the wing.

A different specimen.

An out-of-focus grass stem takes the edge off this shot of a Ringlet butterfly.

With the vertical stripes on the thorax this Helophilus pendulus (The Footballer) is one of the easiest hoverflies to recognise.

However .... this rather darker-bodied specimen is something different – quite what I am still researching.

This much smaller hoverfly also has vertical stripes on the thorax and is Episyrphus balteatus (or Marmalade hoverfly).

This is the larva of the Harlequin Ladybird (Harmonia axyridis). They can bite – they eat aphids – but it is harmless.

A 7-spot Ladybird on a Common Hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium). My first 7-spot here this year. Until the advent of the Harlequin Ladybird 2-spot and 7-spot Ladybirds were about all you ever saw.

A nice and sharp Common Blue Damselfly – for a change.

Despite being cleaved in half this Giant Hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) is still managing to flower.

The giant in close-up. It shared with regular Common Hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium) the feature that the outer flowers in the umbels have larger petals.

Flies like Common Hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium). One assumes the feeling is mutual as they get pollinated

Spiders know that flies like Common Hogweed and lie in wait. I think this Misumena vatia (a crab spider). We can see six of the eight eyes. Not that easy to spot.

Rather small but look on the rock in the middle of the shot – one of a number of Semaphore flies (Poecilobothrus nobilitatus). They fly around and when they settle they open and shut their pale-tipped wings. I had never noticed them until last year: the web suggests anyone with a pond will see these.

The first flowers of Meadowsweet / Mead Wort (Filipendula ulmaria).

(Ed Wilson)

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The Flash: 05:45 – 06:25

(59th visit of the year)

Notes from here
- even larger number of geese this morning with many Greylag Geese as well as the usual Canada Geese
- a different Greylag x Canada Goose this morning – this one needs closer scrutiny to separate from a Canada
- just 1 Great Crested Grebe today
- the Grey Wagtail overhead was my first here since 25 March (I see I logged one here on 09 June last year so perhaps these are birds dispersing after breeding)
- a tailless Pied Wagtail was on the roof of one of the houses in Derwent Drive: my first around the water this year with just two previous fly-over noted as long ago as March
and
- a Figure of Eighty moth on one of the lamps – new for me in Shropshire

Birds noted flying over
- 2 Jackdaws
- 1 Grey Wagtail

Hirundine etc. counts
- 3 Swifts
- 2 House Martins

Warblers counts: number in brackets = singing birds
- 2 (2) Chiffchaffs
- no Blackcaps

The counts from the water
- 2 + 7 Mute Swans
- 43 Greylag Geese
- 1 Greylag x Canada Goose
- 152 Canada Geese
- 1 white feral goose
- 15 (14♂) Mallard again
- 7 (4♂) Tufted Ducks
- 1 Great Crested Grebe
- 4 Moorhens
- 18 + 3 (2 broods) Coots

This Greylag x Canada Goose hardly stands out. The ‘chin-strap’ is pure Canada and it was the eye-ring that I noticed first. Then the bill – all dark on Canada – that confirmed it. The body is almost 100% Canada.

A new species of moth for me in Shropshire – it is (fairly) easy to see why this is called a Figure of Eighty.

Of interest between the lake and The Flash today
- an adult Moorhen on the grass alongside the lower pool
- the usual Chiffchaff singing around the lower pool

(Ed Wilson)

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On this day..........
2016
Priorslee Lake
Today's Sightings Here

2010 
Trench Lock Pool 
4 drake Pochard 
(Ed Wilson)